Brough Family Organization
www.broughfamily.org

Historical Photographs of
northern Staffordshire, England

For historical photographs of Brough sites in Australia, Canada, New Zealand,
United Kingdom and United States visit the Histories website

The Barebones History of Leek (contains pictures of early Leek, Staffordshire)

     The BFO strives to provide accurate information, addresses and photographs of historical Brough locations in England--as shown below and identified in the Histories section of this website--so that family members who want to visit their ancestral homeland can do so when it's most convenient for them.   Needless to say, the BFO hopes the day will come when all Brough descendants who are interested will be able to visit their places of origin and understand more fully the lives of those who did so much to give us what we have.

Here are pictures of some historical Brough sites in northern Staffordshire, England:


Several related Brough families lived in the Leek area of northern Staffordshire in the 1500's and 1600's.  This drawing shows Leek from the south-west in the 1700's, and was produced by J. Aikin in about 1795.  The drawing can be found in the book A History of the County of Stafford: Leek and the Moorlands, edited by M.W. Greenslade, published by Oxford University Press, 1996, volume 7, page 137
(FHL book # British Q area, 942, H2vst, v.7.)


This photograph shows one of the Brough, Nicholson & Hall braid plaiting sheds in the 1890's.  Leek was heavily involved in the silk manufacturing industry during the 1800's through the early 1900's.  In fact, the silk-manufacturing firm of Joshua and James Brough & Company was well known in Staffordshire in the 1800's.  This photograph can be found in the book A History of the County of Stafford: Leek and the Moorlands, edited by M.W. Greenslade, published by Oxford University Press, 1996, volume 7, page 153.
(FHL book # British Q area, 942, H2vst, v.7.)


Broughs resided in and around Leek, Staffordshire since the early 1500's.  The picture above shows one of the older buildings still standing in the 1980's in the vicinity of the "market place" in Leek, Staffordshire, England.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The picture above shows a south side view of the "market place" of Leek, Staffordshire, as it appeared in the 1980's.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The picture above (taken in the 1980's) shows topographic features such as the "Roaches" on the left and the "Hencloud" on the right.  The Brough Hall of Windygates, Leek, and its outbuildings are located in the center of the picture.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The picture above (taken in the 1980's) shows farm outbuildings near the Brough Hall of Windygates, Leek, and looks east across the valley of the Leeke Frith.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The above photograph shows part of the Leekfrith area and Tittesworth Reservoir, where many Brough families have resided since the 1500's.  This picture was taken from the top of Hen Cloud--a rock formation 1,350 feet high in Upper Hulme, Staffordshire.
(Photograph taken by Clayton Brough in August 2002.)


The photograph above (taken in 2000) shows Middle Hulme Hall in Leek, and its 16th and 17th Century construction.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The picture above shows the Brough Hall of Windygates, Leek, as it appeared in the 1980's.  The Hall was erected in 1634 by Thomas Brough and Elizabeth Cotton.  It now serves as a farmhouse and is currently operated by Geoff and Rose Robinson.
(Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The above picture, taken in 2001, shows the Brough Hall of Windygates--presently called Windygates Hall Farm.  Windygates Hall Farm is owned and operated by Geoff and Rose Robinson.
(Photograph taken by James H. Brough in 2001.) 


The picture above (taken in the 1980's) shows that over the entrance porch of the Brough Hall of Windygates, Leek, are the initials of its first owner: "T.B. [Thomas Brough] 1634" [the year it was built].  (Photograph taken by Stanley & Catharine Ann Brough Hind in the 1980's.)


The above picture shows the Ipstones Church in Ipstones, Staffordshire, England.  The children of Richard Brough and Margaretae were christened (baptized) at Ipstones between 1682 and 1700.
(Photograph sent by Stanley and Catharine Ann Brough Hind to the RBFO on 21 March 2001.)  
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The following photographs show pictures of buildings and/or areas where Richard Brough (born 1786) and Mary Horleston and their children lived in Staffordshire, England.  The following census reports provide us with specific addresses where Richard Brough and Mary Horleston lived and raised their children.  Richard Brough served 19 years in the British Army (from 1805-1824) and was a brickmaker during the latter part of his life.  Also, Richard and Mary's sons worked primarily in the mining and brick making trades, while their daughters worked mainly in the potteries.   

Richard Brough and Mary Horleston and/or their children:
1841:  28 Sutherland Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England
1851:  109 Stone Road, Blurton, Trentham, Staffordshire, England
1871:  Russell Street, Trentham, Staffordshire, England

Richard Brough and Rosannah Myatt and/or their children:
1851:  86 Stone Road, Blurton, Trentham, Staffordshire, England
1861:  16 & 18 Russell Street, St. James, Longton, Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England
1871:  16 & 18 Russell Street, St. James, Longton, Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England


The above picture shows part of Sutherland Road.  Richard Brough and Mary Horleston and their family resided at 28 Sutherland Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, in the 1840's.
(Photograph by James H. Brough, March 2001.)

 
The above picture of a small street off Stone Road shows the type of housing that may have been typical in the mid 1800's.  Richard Brough and Mary Horleston and their family lived at 109 Stone Road in the 1850's.
(Photograph by James H. Brough, March 2001.)


This picture shows an old pottery kiln located on Russell Street, Longton.  Richard Brough and Mary Horleston, and/or their son, Richard Brough and his wife Rosannah Myatt, lived at 16 & 18 Russell Street, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, in the 1860's and 1870's.  Richard Brough and Rosannah Myatt and their children worked in the potteries of Longton.
(Photograph by James H. Brough, March 2001.)


The above model is that of St. John's Parish Church, Longton.  Most of the children of Richard Brough and Mary Horleston were christened in St. John's Parish Church, Longton, Staffordshire, England, between 1825 and 1839.  This church--generally known as the Parish of St. John the Baptist, Lane End--was erected in 1764 and demolished in 1979.  The above photograph shows a model of St. Johns' Parish Church which is now on display inside St. James the Less Parish Church (now known as St. James and St. John) in Longton, Staffordshire.
(Photograph by R. Clayton Brough in August 2002.) 

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